Asia Pacific Media Services Asia Analysed
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Asian analysis

Articles: Russian Far East and Russian Organised Crime


Is This Man a 'Lord of War'?

Far Eastern Economic Review, March 6, 2009

Today marks the one year anniversary of alleged Russian arms dealer Viktor Bout's arrest in Bangkok, a contested covert operation that has put Thailand in the geopolitical middle of the United States and Russia.
[read the article at here]

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How not to Grant Autonomy

The Irrawaddy, June, 2006

Birobidzhan, a remote republic within Russia, provides a lesson to Burma on how not to federate along ethnic lines
[more]

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The Chinese are coming... to Russia

Asia Times, May 27, 2006

If headlines in the new and free - but often sensational and irresponsible - Russian press are to be believed, a massive influx of Chinese into Siberia and the Russian Far East is turning the area "yellow" and Russia is about to lose its easternmost provinces. Bertil Lintner reports.
[read the article at www.atimes.com]

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North Korea's creepy-crawly capitalism

Asia Times, May 26, 2006

North Korean capitalism is thriving - just not inside North Korea. Pyongyang has steadily established a string of legitimate and less legitimate front companies across East and Southeast Asia, aimed at earning the cash-strapped government badly needed hard currency. And, as Bertil Lintner finds out, business is booming.
[read the article at www.atimes.com]

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Organized Crime: Spreading Tentacles

Far Eastern Economic Review, October 02, 2003

An influx of illegal Chinese immigrants into the Russian Far East is helping Chinese organized-crime gangs to gain a lucrative new foothold in this lawless territory.
[more]

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Triads tighten grip on Russia's far east

Jane's Intelligence Review, September, 2003

As Chinese Triads in Vladivostok take over the reins of organised crime from Russian groups, Bertil Lintner examines the changing face of Russia's far east.
[more]

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The Russian Mafia in Asia

Tokyo Journal, May 1996

Every month, Valerian, a Russian gangster, pays a tenth of his income to the Church in Ho Chi Minh City. "That's why I'm still alive. I believe in God," he says sipping at a glass of vodka in one of the city's many newly opened bars. "I don't like what I'm doing. But for us there is no other choice if we want to make money."
[more]

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